Dixon, J, Cakal, H, Khan, W, Osmany, M, Majumdar, S and Hassan, M (2016) Contact, Political Solidarity and Collective Action: An Indian Case Study of Relations between Historically Disadvantaged Communities. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 27 (1). pp. 83-95.

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Abstract

Research on the contact hypothesis has highlighted the role of contact in improving intergroup relations. Most of this research has addressed the problem of transforming the prejudices of historically advantaged communities, thereby eroding wider patterns of discrimination and inequality. In the present research, drawing on evidence from a cross‐sectional survey conducted in New Delhi, we explored an alternative process through which contact may promote social change, namely by fostering political solidarity and empowerment amongst the disadvantaged. The results indicated that Muslim students' experiences of contact with other disadvantaged communities were associated with their willingness to participate in joint collective action to reduce shared inequalities. This relationship was mediated by perceptions of collective efficacy and shared historical grievances and moderated by positive experiences of contact with the Hindu majority. Implications for recent debates about the relationship between contact and social change are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Contact, Political Solidarity and Collective Action: An Indian Case Study of Relations between Historically Disadvantaged Communities, which has been published in final form at 10.1002/casp.2296. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving."
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2017 16:19
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 10:43
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/3002

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