Robinson, ZP ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9499-264X, Gu, Y, Li, Y, Li, X ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7417-2556, Luo, P, Wang, H, Wang, X and Wu, J (2017) The feasibility and challenges of energy self-sufficient wastewater treatment plants. Applied Energy, 204. pp. 1463-1475.

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Abstract

Energy efficiency optimization is crucial for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) because of increasing energy costs and concerns about global climate change. Energy efficiency optimization can be achieved through a combination of energy recovery from the wastewater treatment process and energy saving-related technologies. Through these two approaches energy self-sufficiency of WWTPs is achievable, and research is underway to reduce operation costs and energy consumption and to achieve carbon neutrality. In this paper, we analyze energy consumption and recovery in WWTPs and characterize the factors that influence energy use in WWTPs, including treatment techniques, treatment capacities, and regional differences. Recent advances in the optimization of energy recovery technologies and theoretical analysis models for the analysis of different technological solutions are presented. Despite some challenges in implementation, such as technological barriers and high investment costs, particularly in developing countries, this paper highlights the potential for more energy self-sufficient WWTPs to be established in the future.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the accepted author manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via Elsevier at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.02.069 - please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.
Uncontrolled Keywords: wastewater treatment plants, energy consumption, energy recovery, energy self-sufficiency
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Geography, Geology and the Environment
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2017 09:33
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2019 16:48
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/3011

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