Sangaré, I, Djibougou, AD, Yaméogo, BK, Drabo, F, Diabaté, A, Banuls, A, Fournet, F, Price, HP ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1537-4390, Guiguemdé, RT and Dabiré, RK (2016) First Detection of Leishmania infantum in Domestic Dogs from Burkina Faso (West Africa). Research Journal of Parasitology, 12 (1). pp. 27-32.

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Abstract

Background and Objective: Human Visceral Leishmaniasis (HVL) is a systemic neglected tropical diseases and potentially lethal disease caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus. In the causal, agent of HVL is L. infantum and dogs are a major reservoir host. Visceral leishmaniasis is rarely found in West Africa and no cases have been reported to date in Burkina Faso.

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the presence of L. infantum in population of domestic dogs in Bobo-Dioulasso city in Burkina Faso.

Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in five districts of the city Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. An active survey was conducted in households with dogs in five districts of the city for canine leishmaniasis screening.

Epidemiological data and clinical signs were collected for each dog. Venous blood collection and skin lesions biopsies were performed in dogs after informed consent of the owners. The plasma was used for the immunological diagnosis (DiaMed-IT LEISH) and positive samples were confirmed by nested PCR.

Results: A total of 85 dogs were included in the study. For the first time, the occurrence of L. infantum in Burkina Faso was confirmed in five domestic dogs presenting symptomatic signs by immunochromatographic tests. Biopsy samples were positive for L. infantum in PCR analysis.

Conclusion: The findings indicated that L. infantum is circulating within canine populations in Bobo-Dioulasso. Infected dogs would be the reservoir hosts of this visceralising species. Several priorities for public and veterinary health research have been highlighted by this study.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 31 Mar 2017 08:06
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 10:51
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/3104

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