Okot, Betty J (2017) The Social Dimensions of Post-Conflict Land Relations and Policies in Acholiland, Northern Uganda. Doctoral thesis, Keele University.

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Abstract

Since the Lord's Resistance Army's (LRA) retreat from Acholiland in Notthern Uganda (2006), widespread land conflicts were publicised in n1any areas of the district. This 0111its, the success of 1nuch of the resettle1nent process. This ethnography of relations over land and state policies, dc1nonstrates how despite years of rcforn1s, custon1aty tenure in Acholiland, continued in practice. T'hc study recognises, con1n1ercial pressures regarding custotnary tenute and urban and peri-urban land registration. In arguing that what is happening in Acholiland today is focused on people's relationships with land, the thesis goes beyond earlier studies of the war and its immediate aftermath. Most land disputes in Acholiland are very distinct and arc not widespread among kin resettling on patrimonial land. Major conflicts often arise out of a land grab by elite/ individuals, including foreigners who occupy powerful positions - the land grab is concentrated, in one part of Acholiland -- the oil rich areas.
Despite the violence and loss of lives, land disputes met with an organised response from some Acholi politicians and community, this appears to have prevented the alienation of large tracts of land. The cultural leaders under the Ker Kwaro Acholi (KKA) institution, often deal with a second type of prevalent land disputes, among returnees outside their descent group. Such community-level disputes, arc resolved successfully through traditional modes of mediation and the resettlement is progressing well, as people work the land. In Acholiland, land is the foundation for livelihoods, identity, spirituality and social security. These tenets, create a discourse and movement of revival around the land. Indeed, mobilisation against land grab in the district created a movement of land activism, which has been relatively successful. Hence, the LR.A war becomes, in the thesis a window into the past and a basis for connecting the present with the past and the future.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Humanities
Depositing User: Lisa Bailey
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2017 08:56
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2017 08:56
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/4156

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