Xu, L (2017) Political habitus in cross-border student migration: A longitudinal study of mainland Chinese students in Hong Kong and beyond. International Studies in Sociology of Education. ISSN 1747-5066 (In Press)

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Abstract

This paper contributes to the understanding of how shifting time, space and subject positions can impact on the political habitus of border-crossing students. Employing in-depth interview data from a longitudinal project involving 31 mainland Chinese students whose higher education journeys converged in Hong Kong, it argues that it is often unintended outcomes such as the development of a political habitus that can have lasting effects on students’ longer-term life trajectories. This paper’s systematic exposition of these students’ political habitus formation redresses Bourdieu’s relative neglect of the shaping of the political habitus of ‘non-professional’ political agents, in contrast to his emphasis on that of the ‘professionals’, such as politicians. This paper also moves beyond existing literature’s focus on social agents’ experiences in static and unified political fields at specific times by foregrounding the experiences of these mainland Chinese students moving across conflictual political fields over time.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the accepted author manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) will be available online via Taylor & Francis at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/riss20/current - please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.
Uncontrolled Keywords: border, political habitus, political field, doxa, symbolic violence
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences > School of Social Science and Public Policy
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2017 12:40
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2017 12:56
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/4291

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