Peng, Z and Feng, L and Carolyn, GM and Wang, K and Zhu, G and Zhang, Y and Hu, J and Huang, Y and Pan, H and Guo, N and Xing, C and Chu, Y and Cao, Z and Yu, D and Liu, L and Chen, Z and Zeng, F and Xu, W and Xiong, X and Cheng, X and Guo, H and Chen, W and Li, L and Jiang, H and Zheng, J and Xu, Z and Yu, H (2015) Characterizing the epidemiology, virology, and clinical features of influenza in China's first severe acute respiratory infection sentinel surveillance system, February 2011-October 2013. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15. 143 - ?. ISSN 1471-2334

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: After the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, China established its first severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system. METHODS: We analyzed data from SARI cases in 10 hospitals in 10 provinces in China from February 2011 to October 2013. RESULTS: Among 5,644 SARI cases, 330 (6%) were influenza-positive. Among these, 62% were influenza A and 38% were influenza B. Compared with influenza-negative cases, influenza-positive SARI cases had a higher median age (20.0 years vs.11.0, p=0.003) and were more likely to have at least one underlying chronic medical condition (age adjusted percent: 28% vs. 25%, p<0.001). The types/subtypes of dominant strains identified by SARI surveillance was almost always among dominant strains identified by the influenza like illness (ILI) surveillance system and influenza activity in both systems peaked at the same time. CONCLUSIONS: Data from China's first SARI sentinel surveillance system suggest that types/subtypes of circulating influenza strains and epidemic trends among SARI cases were similar to those among ILI cases.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Epidemiology, Virology, Clinical features, Influenza positive patients, China
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Primary Care Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2015 13:09
Last Modified: 25 May 2016 13:34
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/640

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