Kulshrestha, R, Kuiper, JH ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7023-4078, Masri, WE, Chowdhury, JR, Kaur, S, Kumar, N, Lalam, R and Osman, AE (2020) Scoliosis in paediatric onset spinal cord injuries. Spinal Cord.

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Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: This is a retrospective longitudinal review. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review was to identify predictors of developing clinical scoliosis and compare between traumatic and neurological aetiologies of SCI. SETTING: This study was conducted at the Midland Centre of SCI. METHOD: Case notes of all patients injured at an age up to 18 years and admitted between 1971 and 2013 were reviewed. RESULTS: Sixty-nine individuals were identified, of which seven were excluded: three with pre-existing scoliosis and four with spina bifida. The remaining 62 (44 males, 18 females) had a median age at injury of 17 years (inter quartile range 13-17). Of these, 51 (82%) had traumatic and 11 (18%) had neurological injury. Most (42/51; 82%) of the children who had a traumatic injury were older than 13 years. The risk of developing scoliosis was lower for older patients (RR 0.68 per year, 95% CI 0.52-0.83) or following a traumatic injury (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.20-0.66). A multivariable analysis based on age and trauma showed that only older age decreased the risk. A robust Receiver Operator Curve analysis suggested 14.6 years as the optimal threshold to predict development of scoliosis within 10 years (Area Under the Curve; AUC 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.93), sensitivity 70% (95% CI 50-89%), specificity 89% (95% CI 74-100%). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that age below 14.6 years was a predictor for scoliosis. Once adjustment is made for age, the incidence of scoliosis does not differ between traumatic and neurological aetiologies of paediatric SCI injury.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final accepted article and all relevant information can be found at; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41393-020-0418-6
Uncontrolled Keywords: scoliosis, paediatric, spinal cord injuries.
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QM Human anatomy
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R735 Medical education. Medical schools. Research
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Pharmacy and Bioengineering
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2020 11:36
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2020 11:36
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/7765

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