Mountain, Timothy John (1981) Studies of the Chironomidae (Diptera) of some reedbeds. Doctoral thesis, Keele University.

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Abstract

The Chironomidae of a Phragmites reedbed in Cop Mere, Staffordshire, were investigated during 1979 and 1980; emergence from reedbeds was also followed at Linford, Buckinghamshire.
During the period from 1979 to 1980, a marked change occurred at the Cop Mere stations (SI and S2) sampled within the reedbed benthos.
In 1979, the larval population at SI was relatively diverse as compared with 1980, with Glyptotendipes being common; few larvae were found at S2. By the summer of 1980, Camptoahironomus larvae predominated at high densities at both stations and few other genera were found; the weather conditions during late spring 1980 have been implicated as a major cause of the abundance of Camptochironomus in the reedbeds.
The spatial dispersion of Camptoohironcmus larvae was contagious.
Larvae, especially Crieotopus, Glyptotendipes and Pseatroaladius, were particularly abundant on standing stems. The periphyton and stems served variously as food and habitat for different larvae.
Fallen, decaying stems provided a habitat and were colonised by chironomid larvae. Litter decay followed a diphasic pattern, and was enhanced by the presence of macroinvertebrates. Proportions of ash and nitrogen generally increased during the study, while those of a-cellulose and lignin fell.
Emergence of imagines from the reedbeds at Cop Mere in 1979 was generally greater than in 1980, and peak emergence occurred slightly earlier. The Orthocladiinae were particularly common, with Crieotopus sylvestris especially abundant. Total emergence from Phragmites reedbeds at Linford was similar to that at Cop Mere, although more species were recorded at Linford. There was no significant difference between the numbers of imagines emerging from six different reedThe Chironomidae of a Phragmites reedbed in Cop Mere, Staffordshire, were investigated during 1979 and 1980; emergence from reedbeds was also followed at Linford, Buckinghamshire.
During the period from 1979 to 1980, a marked change occurred at the Cop Mere stations (SI and S2) sampled within the reedbed benthos.
In 1979, the larval population at SI was relatively diverse as compared with 1980, with Glyptotendipes being common; few larvae were found at S2. By the summer of 1980, Camptoahironomus larvae predominated at high densities at both stations and few other genera were found; the weather conditions during late spring 1980 have been implicated as a major cause of the abundance of Camptochironomus in the reedbeds.
The spatial dispersion of Camptoohironcmus larvae was contagious.
Larvae, especially Crieotopus, Glyptotendipes and Pseatroaladius, were particularly abundant on standing stems. The periphyton and stems served variously as food and habitat for different larvae.
Fallen, decaying stems provided a habitat and were colonised by chironomid larvae. Litter decay followed a diphasic pattern, and was enhanced by the presence of macroinvertebrates. Proportions of ash and nitrogen generally increased during the study, while those of a-cellulose and lignin fell.
Emergence of imagines from the reedbeds at Cop Mere in 1979 was generally greater than in 1980, and peak emergence occurred slightly earlier. The Orthocladiinae were particularly common, with Crieotopus sylvestris especially abundant. Total emergence from Phragmites reedbeds at Linford was similar to that at Cop Mere, although more species were recorded at Linford. There was no significant difference between the numbers of imagines emerging from six different reed The Chironomidae of a Phragmites reedbed in Cop Mere, Staffordshire, were investigated during 1979 and 1980; emergence from reedbeds was also followed at Linford, Buckinghamshire.
During the period from 1979 to 1980, a marked change occurred at the Cop Mere stations (SI and S2) sampled within the reedbed benthos.
In 1979, the larval population at SI was relatively diverse as compared with 1980, with Glyptotendipes being common; few larvae were found at S2. By the summer of 1980, Camptoahironomus larvae predominated at high densities at both stations and few other genera were found; the weather conditions during late spring 1980 have been implicated as a major cause of the abundance of Camptochironomus in the reedbeds.
The spatial dispersion of Camptoohironcmus larvae was contagious.
Larvae, especially Crieotopus, Glyptotendipes and Pseatroaladius, were particularly abundant on standing stems. The periphyton and stems served variously as food and habitat for different larvae.
Fallen, decaying stems provided a habitat and were colonised by chironomid larvae. Litter decay followed a diphasic pattern, and was enhanced by the presence of macroinvertebrates. Proportions of ash and nitrogen generally increased during the study, while those of a-cellulose and lignin fell.
Emergence of imagines from the reedbeds at Cop Mere in 1979 was generally greater than in 1980, and peak emergence occurred slightly earlier. The Orthocladiinae were particularly common, with Crieotopus sylvestris especially abundant. Total emergence from Phragmites reedbeds at Linford was similar to that at Cop Mere, although more species were recorded at Linford. There was no significant difference between the numbers of imagines emerging from six different reed types at Linford, although emergence from Scirpus maritimus seemed to be greater in both years than from other species. Onset of emergence was thought to be governed primarily by the rate of larval development.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Geography, Geology and the Environment
Contributors: Badcock, R M (Thesis advisor)
Depositing User: Lisa Bailey
Date Deposited: 20 May 2020 14:28
Last Modified: 20 May 2020 14:28
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/8032

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