Hollinghurst, S and Coast, J and Busby, J and Bishop, A and Foster, NE and Franchini, A and Grove, S and Hall, J and Hopper, C and Kaur, S and Montgomery, AA and Salisbury, C (2013) A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of 'PhysioDirect' telephone assessment and advice services for patients with musculoskeletal problems: economic evaluation. BMJ Open, 3 (10). e003406 -?. ISSN 2044-6055

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare the cost-effectiveness of PhysioDirect with usual physiotherapy care for patients with musculoskeletal problems. DESIGN: (1) Cost-consequences comparing cost to the National Health Service (NHS), to patients, and the value of lost productivity with a range of outcomes. (2) Cost-utility analysis comparing cost to the NHS with Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). SETTING: Four physiotherapy services in England. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (18+) referred by their general practitioner or self-referred for physiotherapy. INTERVENTIONS: PhysioDirect involved telephone assessment and advice followed by face-to-face care if needed. Usual care patients were placed on a waiting list for face-to-face care. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Primary clinical outcome: physical component summary from the SF-36v2 at 6 months. Also included in the cost-consequences: Measure Yourself Medical Outcomes Profile; a Global Improvement Score; response to treatment; patient satisfaction; waiting time. Outcome for the cost-utility analysis: QALYs. RESULTS: 2249 patients took part (1506 PhysioDirect; 743 usual care). (1) Cost-consequences: there was no evidence of a difference between the two groups in the cost of physiotherapy, other NHS services, personal costs or value of time off work. Outcomes were also similar. (2) Cost-utility analysis based on complete cases (n=1272). Total NHS costs, including the cost of physiotherapy were higher in the PhysioDirect group by £19.30 (95% CI -£37.60 to £76.19) and there was a QALY gain of 0.007 (95% CI -0.003 to 0.016). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £2889 and the net monetary benefit at λ=£20 000 was £117 (95% CI -£86 to £310). CONCLUSIONS: PhysioDirect may be a cost-effective alternative to usual physiotherapy care, though only with careful management of staff time. Physiotherapists providing the service must be more fully occupied than was possible under trial conditions: consideration should be given to the scale of operation, opening times of the service and flexibility in the methods used to contact patients.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > Primary Care Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2015 15:13
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2015 15:15
URI: http://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/939

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