Weddell, J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9913-9082, Hider, SL ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9958-3909, Mallen, CD ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2677-1028 and Muller, SN ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6645-5751 (2021) What non-pharmacological treatments do people with polymyalgia rheumatica try: results from the PMR Cohort Study. Rheumatology International.

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Abstract

Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is common. The mainstay of treatment, glucocorticoids, are associated with significant adverse effects and many patients remain on high doses for a number of years. Little is known about the use of other, non-pharmacological therapies as adjuncts in PMR. The PMR Cohort Study is an inception cohort study of patients diagnosed with PMR in primary care. This analysis presents data on the use and perceived impact of non-pharmacological therapies from a long-term follow-up survey. Non-pharmacological treatments were classified as either diet, exercise, or complementary therapies. Results are presented as adjusted means, medians, and raw counts where appropriate. One hundred and ninety-seven participants completed the long-term follow-up questionnaire, of these 81 (41.1%) reported using non-pharmacological therapy. Fifty-seven people reported using a form of complementary therapy, 35 used exercise and 20 reported changing their diet. No individual non-pharmacological therapy appeared to be associated with long-term outcomes. The use of non-pharmacological therapies is common amongst PMR patients, despite the paucity of evidence supporting their use. This suggests that people perceive a need for treatment options in addition to standard glucocorticoid regimens. Further research is needed to understand patients' aims when seeking additional treatments and to strengthen the evidence base for their use so that patients can be guided towards effective options.

Item Type: Article
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Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R735 Medical education. Medical schools. Research
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2021 14:28
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2021 14:28
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/10245

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