Bernardini, F, Galizi, R ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3134-7480, Menichelli, M, Papathanos, P-A, Dritsou, V, Marois, E, Crisanti, A and Windbichler, N (2014) Site-specific genetic engineering of the Anopheles gambiae Y chromosome. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 111 (21). 7600 - 7605.

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Abstract

Despite its function in sex determination and its role in driving genome evolution, the Y chromosome remains poorly understood in most species. Y chromosomes are gene-poor, repeat-rich and largely heterochromatic and therefore represent a difficult target for genetic engineering. The Y chromosome of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae appears to be involved in sex determination although very little is known about both its structure and function. Here, we characterize a transgenic strain of this mosquito species, obtained by transposon-mediated integration of a transgene construct onto the Y chromosome. Using meganuclease-induced homologous repair we introduce a site-specific recombination signal onto the Y chromosome and show that the resulting docking line can be used for secondary integration. To demonstrate its utility, we study the activity of a germ-line-specific promoter when located on the Y chromosome. We also show that Y-linked fluorescent transgenes allow automated sex separation of this important vector species, providing the means to generate large single-sex populations. Our findings will aid studies of sex chromosome function and enable the development of male-exclusive genetic traits for vector control.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright & Usage: Freely available online through the PNAS open access option.
Uncontrolled Keywords: Site-specific, genetic, engineering, anopheles gambiae, y chromosome
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Life Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 16 Jan 2020 10:10
Last Modified: 16 Jan 2020 10:10
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/7507

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