Huang, C-Y ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5461-1657, Hseih, YP, Shen, A, Wei, HS, Feng, JY, Hwa, HL and Feng, JY (2019) Relationships between Parent-Reported Parenting, Child-Perceived Parenting, and Children’s Mental Health in Taiwanese Children. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16 (6).

[img]
Preview
Text
CY Huang - Relationships between parent-reporting parenting....pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (344kB) | Preview

Abstract

The current study examines the relationship between parents’ and children’s reports of parenting and their effects on children’s mental health symptoms. Six hundred and sixty-six parent-child dyads in Taiwan participated in this study. The parents and the children filled out the parenting questionnaires, and the children also reported their general mental health. The results demonstrated that parental-reported and child-perceived parenting were positively correlated, but parents tended to report lower scores on authoritarian parenting and higher scores on Chinese parenting than did their children. There were also significant gender differences: The mothers reported higher authoritative parenting than did the fathers; and the boys perceived higher authoritarian and Chinese-culture specific parenting than did the girls. Moreover, the Chinese parenting had a negative effect on children’s mental health outcomes. Finally, our results showed that children’s perception of parenting had a stronger effect on children’s mental health symptoms than did parental reports on parenting, urging future research to include the children’s report when investigating the effects of parenting on children’s mental health outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Uncontrolled Keywords: parenting; culture; gender differences; child mental health
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculty of Natural Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 23 Jan 2020 11:42
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2020 13:40
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/7554

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item