Bishop, A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9810-7994, Chen, Y ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5919-743X, Protheroe, J ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9608-1487, Ogollah, RO ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5777-4117, Bailey, J, Lewis, M ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5290-7833, Jordan, K ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4748-5335 and Foster, NE ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4429-9756 (2020) Providing patients with direct access to musculoskeletal physiotherapy: the impact on general practice musculoskeletal workload and resource use. The STEMS-2 study. Physiotherapy.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the real-world impact of patient direct access to NHS physiotherapy (self-referral) on (a) general practice consultations for musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions and (b) specified clinical management for patients with MSK conditions. DESIGN AND SETTING: Natural experiment in four general practices and the associated physiotherapy service. METHODS: Anonymised routinely collected data were obtained. MSK coded GP consultations, recorded fit notes, MSK-related prescription medication, X-rays and MRI requests, and referrals to secondary care for patients consulting with MSK conditions were identified and trends described across a 6-year period (June 2011 to June 2017). Joinpoint regression analysis was used to identify any significant changes in GP MSK consultation trends before and after the introduction of self-referral to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy service data examined access methods used by patients (GP referred, GP recommended self-referral, true self-referral) and the number of physiotherapy sessions. RESULTS: Direct access resulted in inconsistent impact on general practices. In one arm of the experiment a significant increase in GP consultations was observed and in one arm was stable. Exploratory examination of clinical management showed only requests for X-rays (arm 1) and possibly requests for MRI (arm 2) changed over time. Physiotherapy service referrals showed a low uptake of true self-referral (10% and 6%) in each arm respectively. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to examine the real-world impact of patient direct access to physiotherapy at general practice level. We found no consistent impact of patient direct access on GP MSK workload. Impact on some clinical management was observed but not consistently in the direction suggested by previous studies.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final version of this accepted paper and all relevant details regarding copyrights can be found at; https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031940620303400?via%3Dihub
Uncontrolled Keywords: GP workload, Musculoskeletal, Patient direct access, Physiotherapy, Routinely collected data, Self-referral
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC925 Diseases of the musculoskeletal system
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Primary, Community and Social Care
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2020 13:51
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2020 13:51
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/8484

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