Andrews, Victoria (2020) The effect of sensory stimulation combined with mirror box therapy on fine dexterity of the hand: Mobilisation and Tactile Stimulation (MTS). Journal of Academic Development and Education Student Edition, 2020.

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Abstract

Purpose: To look at the effect of Mobilisation and Tactile stimulation (MTS) combined with mirror box therapy on fine dexterity of the hand. There is a gap in the literature for the use of mirror therapy, the 9 Hole Peg Test (9HPT) and MTS combined with healthy participants to assess the effects on dexterity in the upper limb.

Method: A before and after study allowed most transparency in answering the research question. Comparison of intervention data against control data was undertaken to allow the effect of sensory stimulation to be identified on motor control. 15 subjects with normal hand function were tested in the MTS group. The 9HPT was performed and timed in seconds, on each hand. MTS was given for 15 minutes on the non-dominant hand, this hand was then put in the mirror box whilst the dominant hand 16 undertook 10 repetitions of the 9HPT. Finally the 9HPT was performed again on both hands and timed in seconds.

Results: Independent T-test results for non-dominant (p=0.37) and dominant hands (p=0.579) were insignificant and ANOVA result (p=0.845) was also insignificant. The cut off for statistical significance in this study was p ≤ 0.05.

Conclusion: The results showed no statistically significant effect of sensory stimulation and mirror feedback on affecting motor control, in a healthy, asymptomatic population. The results can be applied to the clinical setting, as it can be speculated, when also looking at other studies, that mirror therapy combined with MTS will have some impact on dexterity of the hand. Further research, using a larger sample size and more rigorous MTS therapy protocol is however needed to justify the findings.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Allied Health Professions
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2020 13:24
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2020 13:58
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/8600

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