Morden, A, Ong, BN, Jinks, C ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3407-2446, Healey, EL ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8356-0825, Finney, A ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7353-7480 and Dziedzic, KS ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1168-8993 (2020) Resistance or appropriation? : Uptake of exercise after a nurse-led intervention to promote self-management for osteoarthritis. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine.

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Abstract

The philosophical underpinning of trials of complex interventions is critiqued for not taking into account causal mechanisms that influence potential outcomes. In this article, we draw from in-depth interviews (with practice nurses and patients) and observations of practice meetings and consultations to investigate the outcomes of a complex intervention to promote self-management (in particular exercise) for osteoarthritis in primary care settings. We argue that nurses interpreted the intervention as underpinned by the need to educate rather than work with patients, and, drawing from Habermasian theory, we argue that expert medicalised knowledge (system) clashed with lay 'lifeworld' prerogatives in an uneven communicative arena (the consultation). In turn, the advice and instructions given to patients were not always commensurate with their 'lifeworld'. Consequently, patients struggled to embed exercise routines into their daily lives for reasons of unsuitable locality, sense-making that 'home' was an inappropriate place to exercise and using embodied knowledge to test the efficacy of exercise on pain. We conclude by arguing that using Habermasian theory helped to understand reasons why the trial failed to increase exercise levels. Our findings suggest that communication styles influence the outcomes of self-management interventions, reinforce the utility of theoretically informed qualitative research embedded within trials to improve conduct and outcomes and indicate incorporating perspectives from human geography can enhance Habermas-informed research and theorising.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Uncontrolled Keywords: Osteoarthritis, complex interventions, qualitative methods, Habermas, process evaluation, public health
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC925 Diseases of the musculoskeletal system
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC927 Rheumatism
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Primary, Community and Social Care
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Symplectic
Date Deposited: 24 Feb 2021 10:00
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2021 10:00
URI: https://eprints.keele.ac.uk/id/eprint/9179

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